Bierocks Recipe – And Variations

Homemade Hot Pockets

If you’ve ever bought the commercial-grade Hot Pockets brand snacks, you’ve had to wonder what was in them, right?  I mean – how can you put something in the microwave and never, ever know if it’s going to be a pizza-cicle on the inside or molten cheese-lava?  It’s positively diabolical!  And the ingredients?  I’ve seen fewer chemicals in my students’ old chem lab experiments.  So to spare us all the agony of boiled palates and pickled innards, here’s an authentic bierocks recipe.

The basic idea is borrowed from my Kansas bierock recipe – a soft bread outside with meat and cheese on the inside. Nothing artificial, no preservatives – just chewy, meaty, cheesy goodness!


I recommend using a silicone mat when baking your bierocks to avoid sticking and make cleanup easier. Here’s a good option

Sweet & Savory Baking Mats from Stonewall Kitchen

There are two parts to the recipe – the bread and the filling.  Starting with the bread, you can follow the recipe on my bierocks page if you would like to try the traditional Kansas version, or continue on and see some of the variations I’ve made.

Bierocks recipe

Bierocks Recipe – And Variations

Half whole-wheat, half all-purpose, slightly sweet dough to use with all bierock recipes.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Whole Wheat Bierock Dough
Servings: 24 rolls
Author: Don Herman

Ingredients

  • 4 1/2 tsp Active Dry Yeast 2 packs
  • 3/4 cup Sugar plus 1 tbsp for yeast
  • 1 cup Warm Water 110F
  • 1 tbsp Salt
  • 2 cups Warm Milk
  • 8 cups Flour I used 1/2 whole wheat and 1/2 unbleached organic all-purpose flour
  • 8 tbsp Melted Butter
  • 2 lg Eggs
  • Your choice of filling

Instructions

  • In a small bowl, combine yeast and 1 Tbl sugar. Whisk in 1 cup warm water. In another bowl, combine salt, warm milk and 3/4 cup sugar.
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine 4 cups of flour, melted butter and eggs. Mix with paddle or spoon, then add yeast mixture and the milk mixture. Mix to combine. Cover with plastic wrap and let sponge for 1/2 hour, or until frothy.
    Sponge stage of dough
  • Remove the wrap and stir in the remaining 4 cups of flour. Turn out the dough (it will be sticky) onto a well-floured surface. Knead the dough, adding all-purpose flour until it’s no longer sticky, but smooth and elastic – about 8 to 10 minutes.
    Why whole wheat? I enjoy the nuttier flavor as well as the added fiber.
  • Spray the large bowl with cooking spray and place the kneaded dough in the bowl, turning to coat. Cover with wrap and let rise for another 1 1/2 hours – or until double. (Mine only took 1 hour).
  • Punch the risen dough down and your ready to roll.
    Bierock dough ready to be cut
  • When the dough has risen, turn it out again onto a heavily floured board or surface.  You’ll need to cut it into 24 somewhat even pieces.  I cut the big lump in 1/4, then stretched those pieces out and cut them into 6 pieces.  A little variation is fine.  Cover your pieces with plastic wrap while you work rolling them out.
    Bierock dough ready to be rolled
  • Roll a piece of dough into a ball, then with a rolling pin roll it out to about 1/8″ to 1/4″ thick. Even at 1/8″ you’ll have plenty of bread, so don’t worry about making them too thin. You should have a circle about 6″ in diameter.
  • Place 1/2 cup filling in the center, then top with 1 Tbl of cheese. Pull up opposite sides of the circle and pinch them together. Pull the OTHER sides together and do the same. Pinch up the sides to seal all the way, fold all this under the roll and place that side down onto a greased sheet or baking pan.
  • Bake the rolls at 350 for 25 minutes, until the rolls are golden brown.

Notes

You can serve immediately, or let them cool, store in plastic freezer bags and reheat them anytime. They keep very well in the freezer.
To reheat, 2 minutes on high in the microwave will heat one roll.

While the dough is rising and/or sponging, you can work on the fillings.  To be honest, I opened up the fridge and just looked around.  I had ground beef, ground sausage, two small blocks of cheddar cheese, and half a bag of Mexican cotija cheese (sometimes called Mexican parmesan.)  Perfect!  I’ll make three different types of bierocks – a ground beef pizza, a spicy sausage Italian, and a ground beef, broccoli and onion with cotija cheese.

Ground Beef Pizza Filling for Bierocks

Ground Beef Pizza Filling for Bierocks

A tangy beef pizza filling for bierocks.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Ground Beef Pizza Filling for Bierocks
Servings: 24 rolls
Author: Don Herman

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Ground Beef
  • 1/2 Onion chopped
  • 6 oz Cheddar Cheese grated
  • 2 tsp Italian Spices or blend
  • 1 tsp Salt If not in the spice blend
  • 1 dash Red Pepper Flakes
  • 1 can Tomato Paste not sauce

Instructions

  • Brown the ground beef and onion until the onion is translucent. Drain well. In a small bowl, mix beef, spices, salt and tomato paste until blended.

Spicy Sausage Italian Filling for Bierocks

Spicy Sausage Italian Filling

Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Spicy Sausage Italian Filling
Servings: 24 rolls
Author: Don Herman

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Italian sausage
  • 1/2 onion chopped
  • 4 large mushrooms sliced or chopped
  • 6 oz cheddar cheese grated
  • 1/2 tsp of salt
  • 1 small can tomato paste not sauce

Instructions

  • Brown the sausage, onion and mushrooms until the onion is translucent and the mushrooms are softened. Drain well. In a small bowl, mix sausage, salt and tomato paste. Set aside.

Broccoli and Cotija Cheese Filling for Bierocks

Broccoli and Cotija Cheese Filling

Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Broccoli and Cotija Cheese Filling
Servings: 24 rolls
Author: Don Herman

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1/2 onion chopped
  • 1 small head of broccoli or 1 small thawed bag of frozen broccoli cuts
  • 1/4 head cabbage chopped
  • 1/2 cup grated Cotija cheese
  • Salt/pepper to taste the cheese is salty, so you won’t need much
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds

Instructions

  • Brown the ground beef, onion and cabbage until the onion is translucent.  In a bowl, mix the beef, cheese, salt, pepper and caraway.  If using fresh broccoli, blanch the head in hot water for about a minute before chopping.  If using frozen, DRAIN WELL on paper towels and set aside.

Notes

Cotija cheese is found in the cheese section, near the grated parmesan.  It has a more intense flavor than parmesan and is quite salty and dry – perfect for this recipe.

Use high-quality spices for this recipe to maximize the flavor. Here are some good choices from Savory Spice:

Baharat – 1/2 Cup Jar | Savory Spice Shop

Baharat means “spice” in Arabic and is an all-purpose Middle Eastern blend. It is also known as Lebanese Allspice. Like curries, there are many variations. Our version has a little heat to it, about a 3 on a scale of 1 to 10. Since it is an all-purpose blend, you can try Baharat in many dishes. It’s traditionally used in kibbeh and to flavor ground meats, stews, and soups. Used sparingly, it can be sprinkled on fish before grilling. Try on lamb or as a dry marinade on your next roast. For a dry marinade, rub seasoning thoroughly into the roast and refrigerate for one hour, then cook.[More]

Price: $7.25
Ancho Chile Powder – 1/2 Cup Jar | Savory …

Anchos are the sweetest of all dried chiles. Also known as poblano when fresh, they are only a 1 on heat scale of 1 to 10. Anchos are the most commonly used chile in their native Mexico, long used to thicken sauces and spice up tamales. The dark rich color of the whole chile isn’t lost in the grinding. In fact, the rich burgundy color of ground ancho can be found in many spice blends. Indian tribes would string together chiles and tie them to the sides of their canoes to keep away evils in the water. Use in mole, stews, chili, and rice and beans. Also great on eggs, potatoes, pork and chicken, anchos are good for more than just Spanish style foods.[More]

Price: $6.10

I would love to hear about your variations. Leave a note and share.

Recommended Articles

4 Comments

  1. Avatar

    I have been looking for a recipe for better dough for my Runzas (bierocks in Nebraska). I used 2C of wheat flour and this recipe came out great! I added some beer brats to the meat for a little flabor. Had a lot left over dough so I just turned it into cinnamon rolls slathering the dough with softened butter, cinnamon, brown sugar and a little flour to keep the filling from oozing out. Rolls were great with this dough recipe as well.

    1. Avatar

      I’m so glad you liked it. I’ve made these many times, and the dough always works really well. 🙂

  2. Avatar

    I add chopped fresh parsley to my meat mixture and a couple tablespoons of ketchup. I usually use the frozen Rhoades dinner rolls because 2 of them make the perfect rolling size but I am going to use your bread recipe next time I make them. I was transplanted to Wakeeney, Kansas in 1970 when my mom remarried and moved my two sisters and I there. I really enjoyed all the German cooking and have raised my children up to love many of them also. Bierocks is the most requested at family get togethers. Thank you for posting a well written version of this recipe. Would enjoy any others you care to share!

    1. Avatar

      That sounds fun and simple, and keeping it simple is always best, IMO. I think you’ll like my dough better than the Rhodes – it’s more like the dough my grandma used to make, and it’s not so sticky and hard to work with. I’ll get some more recipes together and share them later on in the season. Let me know how yours turn out, or if you have suggestions on improving the instructions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




Follow Me!