Homemade Golden Syrup

Homemade Golden Syrup (for Americans)

Homemade Golden Syrup for Americans

Golden Syrup




If you peruse a lot of recipe sites, you’ll probably run across an ingredient that’s unfamiliar to most Americans: “Golden Syrup.” Folks in the UK will recognize it immediately, as it’s sold in every store under the brand name “Lyle’s.”  Sometimes it’s referred to as “treacle,” though real treacle is darker than what you’d get in a can of Lyle’s.

Golden syrup is something I make myself and use in recipes that call for corn syrup. It’s super-easy to make, keeps for a long time on the shelf, and isn’t over-processed like typical American corn syrup.

In searching for recipes, you’ll often find them written in the European metric weights. I’ve included both metric and English measurements for you. The English measurements are in WEIGHT, not volume, so you’ll need to weigh them on a scale and not in a measuring cup.  If you’re lucky enough to have a metric scale, just use those measurements.  If you’re like me and have only an English-system scale, I’ve converted the grams into ounces.  Just remember, these are WEIGHT ounces, which are not the same as volume ounces!  Don’t mix the two; everything must be weighed to get the right proportion.

Stick to all English or all metric units. I’ve balanced out the ounces to match the proportions of the metric version, but they’re not exactly the same.

Golden Syrup in English and Metric

Ingredients:

Step one:

Organic or White Sugar – 200 grams or 7 ounces
Water – 50 grams or 1 3/4 ounces

Step two:

Sugar – 1 kilogram or 35 ounces (2 lbs. plus 3 oz.)
Water – 800 grams boiling water, or 28 ounces
Lemon slice or 1 tsp juice (OK, so this is one volume measurement, but it works!)

Directions:

Very important: Sterilize two 1 pint glass canning jars by boiling them in a pot of water.  Let them dry with a canning lid set loosely on top.

Measure and have all your ingredients ready before starting, because once the sugar carmelizes, you need to move fast.  Have the second-step items ready, including the hot water.

In a large, heavy saucepan, heat the 50 grams (1 3/4 oz.) water and the 200 grams (7 oz.) of sugar to dissolve.  Continue heating on medium heat until the mixture starts to carmelize and turn a dark golden color.  I stir with a wooden spoon fairly constantly, but others just give it a swirl now and then.  This will take about 30 minutes and is the only labor-intensive part.

Toward the end, you’ll see a bit of sugar crust forming on the edges and over the top – don’t worry, this will all be taken care of with the addition of the next batch of water.  Just focus on the color – you want a medium golden color.

Carmelize Sugar

Once you’ve reached the right hue, slowly add the boiling water and the lemon.  Stir in the 1 kilogram (35 oz.) of sugar and stir to dissolve.  Bring this mixture to a very low simmer, then start your timer.  You shouldn’t need to do anything after this but give it a swirl now and then.  Simmer this mixture for 45 minutes.

Remove the pan from the heat and let cool for 10 minutes or so.  Some recipes call for straining it into the jars, but I’ve never needed to do that – it comes out very smooth and clear just as it is.

Seal the jars and that’s it!  You can store this on a shelf for months.  Use it 1:1 in recipes that call for corn syrup.  Or use it in this recipe for Millionaire Shortbread.  It’s great stuff.


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Golden Syrup Recipe for Americans
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2 thoughts on “Homemade Golden Syrup (for Americans)”

  1. I’ve made various “homemade” items before, but syrup? It’s never crossed my mind! Interesting too, because I make pancakes quite often! Not only does this show how simple and fascinating making syrup is, but it’s motivated me to give it a try! If this turns out better than the syrup I get at the store, then I already know what I’ll be doing from now.

    Thank you!

    1. Making syrup is a kind of meditative little task for me! Just keep stirring, just keep stirring . . . LOL! But I can tell you the product is beautiful and tastes delicious

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